Where-is-it--#83

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken and what it’s of ? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer next week. Good luck!

Apologies for the delayed answer – and well done to Janet Homes – this indeed part of the inscription on the plinth of a monument topped by a bust of Baron Paul Julius von Reuter. The work of Michael Black, the granite bust was created in 1976 in commemoration of the 125th anniversary of the Reuters news agency that started at No. 1 Royal Exchange Buildings on 14th October, 1851, close to where the monument stands just outside the east entrance of the Royal Exchange.

Where-is-it-#82

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken and what it’s of ? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer next week. Good luck!

Sorry for the delay in providing the answer! Well done to James and Runner – while there are a number of similar weathervanes around London, this one does indeed sit atop the Liberty department store. Located above the mock Tudor store in Great Marlborough Street, the gilded weathervane is modelled on the Mayflower which took pilgrims to America in 1620. Interestingly, the nautical theme also employed during construction of the building in the 1920s – timbers from the HMS Impregnable and HMS Hindustan were used in the project, the frontage of which was the same length of the HMS Hindustan. For more, see www.liberty.co.uk.

Where-is-it--#81

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken and what it’s of ? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer next week. Good luck!

Well done to David Harry – this is indeed on the front of the Foundling Museum in Bloomsbury and is a bust of the Foundling Hospital’s founder Thomas Coram. For more Coram, see our previous Famous Londoners post.

Where-it-it--#80

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken and what it’s of ? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer next week. Good luck!

Apologies for the delay in getting the answer up. But the answer is that this can be found on a monument outside an entrance to the Royal Park of Bushy Park located in Hampton Wick, in London’s west. The monument is erected to the memory of a Hampton Wick shoemaker, Timothy Bennet, who led a campaign to establish a public right of way through the park which in 1752 had been enclosed by Lord Halifax. Bennet, whose business had been adversely affected by the enclosure, won his bid to have the footpath created (he died two years later) and Cobbler’s Walk still exists, running from Sandy Lane in Hampton Wick through the park to High Street in Hampton Hill. Thanks Timothy Bennet!

Where-is-it--#79

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer next week. Good luck!

This bronze sculpture is indeed located in Spitalfields. Named A Pear and A Fig, the still life was created by Ali Grant in 2006 and installed in Bishops Square just outside the western end of Spitalfields Market. There’s a suggestion it has been moved – we’ll endeavour to confirm that!

Where-is-it--#78

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken (and what it represents)? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

These space invaders are located on the ground at the entrance to St Dunstan’s Court, just off the north side of Fleet Street. The plaque commemorates the role new computer technologies played in the demise of the traditional Fleet Street printing process. It’s one of a series of eight plaques referring to aspects of the printing industry located at the entrance to courts.

Where-is-it--#77

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

Sorry about the delay in getting the answer to you! But yes, as Baldwin and Jennifer both answered, this bust of King Charles I does indeed sit on the wall of St Margaret’s Church opposite the Houses of Parliament, above a blocked doorway. There is a story that the statue of Oliver Cromwell which stands opposite, outside Westminster Hall, has his eyes deliberately averted from the King (after all, he did help him lose his head). But Cromwell statue, by Hamo Thornycroft, was placed in position well before the bust – it’s placement dates from the turn of the 19th century while the bust (one of a pair) wasn’t placed on the church until 1956 (a gift of The Society of King Charles the Martyr which annually commemorates the king’s death). Still, it’s a fitting placement.

Where-is-it--#76

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

If you’ve been living in suspense for the past couple of weeks, then you need wait no longer. This coffin-shaped object is actually an interactive musical artwork commemorating clown Joseph Grimaldi (1776-1837), credited as the father of modern clowning, and the man remembered in the annual clown service held at Holy Trinity Church in Hackney each February. The artwork (and another next to it dedicated to theatre proprietor Charles Dibdin the Younger) was created by Henry Krokatsis and is located in Joseph Grimaldi Park on Pentonville Road in Clerkenwell – the site of the churchyard of the former Pentonville Chapel. The memorial is actually located on the site of Grimaldi’s grave (the gravestone has been moved and now stands nearby) and is tuned so that his popular song Hot Codlins can be played by standing on it.

Where-is-it--#75

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

Well done to Sean, Carol and Candy – this is indeed in College Hill, just up from the church of St Michael Paternoster Royal. The famous Whittington (you can read more on him in our earlier entry Famous Londoners: Richard ‘Dick’ Whittington) was buried in the church (you can read more about the church in our earlier entry 10 curiously named churches of London – 9. St Michael Paternoster Royal).

Where-is-it--#74

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken and what it’s of? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

Well done to Candy Blackham, this is indeed the St Peter’s Church, Vere Street, also known variously as the Oxford Chapel and the Marylebone Chapel. Designed by James Gibbs in 1722, it was originally built as a chapel of ease to supplement the parish church of Marylebone and later served the congregation of All Souls Church, Langham Place, while damage to their chapel caused during the war was repaired. It now houses the London Institute for Contemporary Christianity.

Where is it? #73…

November 9, 2013

Where-is-it--#73

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken and what it’s of? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

This is actually a picture of the Twickenham War Memorial, commemorating those who died in World War I and World War II. The bronze figure, the work of Mortimer Brown, sits in Twickenham’s Radnor Gardens, once the site of a house owned by the Earl of Radnor which sits on the bank of the River Thames. The memorial was recently restored following a campaign by the Friends of Radnor Gardens after one of its bronze plaques was stolen.

Where is it? #72…

November 1, 2013

Where-is-it--#72

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken and what it’s of? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

Well done to Jameson, this is indeed the steeple of the church of St Mary Magdalen Bermondsey, located in Bermondsey Street. The first record of the church dates from about 1290 when the church belonged to the Prior and Convent of Bermondsey, although a church did apparently exist some time prior. The current building largely dates from around 1690.

Where-is-it--#71

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken and what it’s of? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

Well done to Jameson, this lighthouse sculpture does indeed adorn a building at 42 Moorgate. It has been suggested that the lighthouse, which apparently did once work, was the symbol of The Ocean Accident and Guarantee Corporation Ltd, the original occupant of the building. As Jameson points out, if you do want to know more, there is a terrific article on the sculpture here.

Where is it? #69…

October 11, 2013

Where-is-it--#69Can you identify where in London this picture was taken and what it’s of? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

Congrats to Carol Stanley – this statue is located in St George’s Gardens (a formal burial ground located near Coram’s Fields, famous for containing the tomb of Oliver Cromwell’s grand-daughter Anna Gibson). The terracotta figure is of Euterpe, the muse of instrumental music, and, interestingly it (and eight others) once adorned the facade of the Apollo Inn on Tottenham Court Road (the building was demolished in 1961 and the statue subsequently found its way here). For more on these gardens, check out www.friendsofstgeorgesgardens.org.uk.

Where is it? #68…

October 4, 2013

Where-is-it--#68

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken and what it’s of? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

Well done to Renate, John, Diego and José who all correctly named this as the Boy with a Dolphin fountain in Hyde Park’s Rose Garden. The fountain, which is the work of Alexander Munro and dates from 1862, was once the centrepiece of the Victoria-era sunken garden which stood on the site of a former reservoir but was removed to make way for the widening of Park Lane. The fountain was moved to The Regent’s Park in 1960 but returned to Hyde Park in 1995. The Rose Garden, located close to Hyde Park Corner, also contains an older fountain – the Artemis Fountain, which dates from 1822.

Image

We’re taking a break this week at Exploring London but we couldn’t resist posting a Where is it? for you. Can you identify where in London this picture was taken and what it’s of? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer late this week. Good luck!

Sorry for the delay in getting the answer over. And well done to those who correctly named this as being at Guy’s Hospital in Southwark. Now a part of the Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust (and home to King’s College London’s School of Medicine), the hospital was originally founded by Sir Thomas Guy in 1721. The statue is indeed that of Viscount Nuffield, one of the hospital’s benefactors. Keep an eye out of our upcoming entry on Sir Thomas as part of our ‘Famous Londoners’ series.

Where-is-it--#66

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken and what it’s of? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

The leaf shape was probably a bit of a giveaway but well done to Val – this is indeed located in Kew Gardens. It’s on the wall of the Rhizotron, located under the Xstrata Treetop Walkway, which takes people underground to see the relationships between tree roots, oil and organisms such as nematodes, beetles, woodlice and bacteria. For more on Kew, see www.kew.org.

Where-is-it--#65

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

Apologies for the delay in revealing the answer to this. The picture shows a bronze sculpture entitled ‘Break the Wall of Distrust’, located in a niche at the corner of Cannon Street and Laurence Poutney Lane (number 108 Cannon Street). Designed by Soviet artist Zurab Tsereteli, it dates from 1990.

Where-is-it--#64

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

Well done to Jamie, this is indeed the tower of St Giles Cripplegate, located  just off Fore Street in the Barbican Estate. The church – the oldest building in the area – dates from about 1090 and was rebuilt in 1545 after it was destroyed by a fire. The new building survived the Great Fire of 1666 but didn’t fare so well in a fire of 1897 or in the Blitz when all but the outer shell was destroyed. Oliver Cromwell was married here in 1620 and the poet John Milton was buried here in 1674 (he had written much of Paradise Lost locally) (interestingly, his body was apparently exhumed about 100 years later, workman took some souvenirs including teeth and a rib). Others buried here include explorer Sir Martin Frobisher, John Foxe, author of The Book of Martyrs, and Bible translator Lancelot Andrews. For more on the church, see www.stgilescripplegate.com.

Where-is-it-#63

Can you identify where in London this picture was taken (a bit harder this week)? If you think you can, leave a comment below. We’ll reveal the answer early next week. Good luck!

It did indeed prove to be a bit harder this week! This decoration can be found on the south side of the exterior of Hampton Court Palace – the clue is in the intertwined initials W and M, standing for King William III and Queen Mary II. The joint monarchs commissioned Sir Christopher Wren to rebuild the entire palace but finances and time meant he only rebuilt the king’s and queen’s apartments which can be visited there today. For more on the palace, see www.hrp.org.uk/HamptonCourtPalace/WilliamandMarybuildanewpalace.